Tag Archives: views

Investigating the Facebook Generation: A Case Study on the Nashville Library’s YA Social Media Tactics–Part IV

The Nashville Public Library’s Main Branch brings in an array of students to the Teen Department including:

– Hume Fogg Academic Magnet

-Martin Luther King Magnet

-East Literature Magnet

-Hunter’s Lane

-McGavock

-Pearl Cohn

-Big Picture                                                  [click the photo above for more Bus info!]

-Cane Ridge

-Hillwood

The Metropolitan Transit Authority makes bussing possible from all of these schools to downtown Nashville; these teens have many different choices for after-school programs or destinations, but they choose the downtown library.

I got the chance to chat with some of the teens a few weeks ago about how they feel about social media, specifically relating to the library.

What Teens Think

One Hunter’s Lane student and ROTC leader explained his love for Facebook:

“It’s a different way to talk to people outside of school.”

A McGavock student commented that Facebook interaction would be great with the library to share pictures and increase “library exposure.” If the Teen Department had a Twitter account, he would definitely follow them in order to keep up with events.

Events like the ones documented on the nplmainya’s flickr (for example, the summer reading party to the left) could potentially go unnoticed without social media interaction.

 

Another student mentioned that Facebook would connect everyone for contests more easily, making them easier to know about; she would also like to be able to keep up with events in this way, as she has missed too many for her liking.

However, concerning Twitter, she exclaimed:

“NO! I DON’T WANT TO FOLLOW THE LIBRARY!”

[This feeling relates back to James’ point of what the library has to offer the teens.]

Finally, one well-spoken Senior from Cane Ridge explained his view to me; for the library’s purposes, he believes that Facebook is better, as it would offer more information, but he would still follow the Teen Department on Twitter.

At Cane Ridge, though, he asserted, “Most people are on Twitter; they do it in class on their phones because it is easier than Facebook.”

What It Comes Down To

 

Like James mentioned in his interview, the YA department’s social media presence should be about functionality.

The teens, though, seem very optimistic about using social media in order to connect with their library.

 

The Problem & What’s Next

Advertising, or getting the word out, about the YA Department’s social media efforts is key, but with time resources limited, devotion to the social media platform is limited at best.

The final installment of this series will present some ideas for improvement!


Investigating the Facebook Generation: A Case Study on the Nashville Library’s YA Social Media Tactics– Part III

An Interview with James McClanahan: Teen Program Coordinator

James easily connects with students in the teen section of the library with his fun, commanding personality.

In fact, James worked in the YA department when I was a teenager, and he has only become more friendly and welcoming since I sat amongst those same shelves.

James’ View on Social Media 

There are opportunities for teens to connect with the library through social media, specifically with emailing in book reviews for the blog that has just been updated, now running through WordPress, as well as through the library’s teen Facebook page.

However, James has some qualms about the effectiveness of social media with his core group of students downtown.

James thinks it’s difficult to promote Facebook; he said,

“What do we (the library) have to offer them [on Facebook]?”

The Problem

According to James, the library is unaware of how to utilize social media efficiently.

He explained, “The library does not have the right mindset.”

James also discussed his efforts in trying to put up events on the YA blog, but administrators rejected this proposal, as they wanted to keep it an exclusive place for book reviews.

This is why his fun videos like this sit on an outdated Flickr account, unnoticed.

Events are probably the most important aspect of the teen area, apart from the daily socialization and homework time.

James believes that “face-to-face time” is more important than a social media presence right now.

“Interactivity is key,” he explained, but in reference to personal relationships.

Where’s Twitter, again?

The YA Department does not have access to NPL’s Twitter account, referenced in Part I, nor does it have its own Twitter. According to James, the YA department can submit tweets the administration of @NowatNPL, but they have to be approved.

Regardless, the process is a little too lengthy to the average tweeter.

“If there was some magical formula, we’d use it…”

James asserted, “If there was some magical formula, we’d use it.”

The issue, though, is that there isn’t; however, James realizes that they could take advantage of this extra communication. However, the YA department would have to consider functionality.

“Facebook [and] texting are big,” James explained, expressing interest in setting up text updates for events in the YA department.

He also hopes to set “Teen Web” as the homepage for the public computers in the department.

Social Functionality

After past educational programs flopped, the YA department focuses mostly on fun social programs  and events to create a sense of community.

However, since the teens are physically there every weekday, James questions the functionality of social media.

What’s Next?

Part IV will give us perhaps the most important point of view– the teen patrons of the YA department!


Initial Vision Musing

At Belmont University, swirling in a sea of Music Business and Nursing Majors, I stand tall with my microcosm of English Majors, feeling a little uncomfortable and a bit too pretentious. However, the incredible quality of great minds constantly pelts me with names of authors and books, quotes flowing from lips that never tire.

There is no difference between literature and life; words are the human experience.

My initial vision for this site is to share and explore both the concepts brought about in literature, society, and simple, seemingly boring lives. It’s all there—already written down.

This is why literacy is crucial. For any sort of understanding of your place in life, you must read. Then, rather than keeping your thoughts to yourself, write it out.

When that’s not enough and you grow bored with keeping your thoughts to yourself, share them.

And what better way to share them than to get plugged in to volunteering or discussion groups?

Through this site, I hope to promote thought, connection, and literacy.

(Here’s where my Public Relations Minor enters the picture…)

Read; Write. Become Aware of the Human Condition.